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BACKGROUND

JIM-Study 2017 - Youth, Information, (Multi-) Media

Baseline Study on media-behaviour of twelve to 19 year olds in Germany

Medienpädagogischer Forschungsverbund Südwest (mpfs)
Medienpädagogischer Forschungsverbund Südwest (mpfs)
Ansicht: JIM-Studie 2017 - Jugend, Information, (Multi-) Media Basisuntersuchung zum Medienumgang 12- 19-Jähriger in Deutschland

As part of the JIM study 2017, twelve to 19-year-olds in Germany were interviewed in addition to the general use of media and their media dealings with regard to homework, learning and school. Altogether, pupils between the ages of 12 and 19 years estimate that they spend an average of 97 minutes on a weekday with their homework (with and without computer / internet), while girls invest much more time with 115 minutes than boys (80 minutes). Almost half of their learning and homework time (45% and 44 minutes, respectively), the 12 to 19-year-old students work every day at home on the computer or on the internet for school. The digital homework time increases with the age of the young people from a good half hour for the twelve to 13-year-olds to a good hour for the full age students. As part of the JIM study 2017, twelve to 19-year-olds in Germany were interviewed in addition to the general use of media and their media dealings with regard to homework, learning and school. Altogether, pupils between the ages of 12 and 19 years estimate that they spend an average of 97 minutes on a weekday with their homework (with and without computer / internet), while girls invest much more time with 115 minutes than boys (80 minutes). Almost half of their learning and homework time (45% and 44 minutes, respectively), the 12 to 19-year-old students work every day at home on the computer or on the Internet for school. The digital homework time increases with the age of the young people from a good half hour in the twelve to 13-year-olds to a good hour for the full age students.

If you look at the use of digital media in school, so far, only the whiteboard (31%) and the computer (22%) have significantly arrived in everyday school life (used at least several times a week). Smartphones (13%), laptops (9%) or tablet PCs (4%) still do not play a big role. Also, the further consideration of the use at least once a month confirms this picture: Only one in ten students uses a tablet PC in school (11%) over the period of four weeks, one in four uses a notebook (25%) and one in three uses a smartphone (31%). Only whiteboards (43%) and stationary computers (59%) are used monthly for every second student.

In addition to the frequency of using various digital media at school, the 2017 JIM study also focuses on the skills of young people in dealing with standard software. The adolescents were asked to rate themselves on how to assess their abilities in relation to the basic programs Word, Excel and PowerPoint (or programs of other software providers with comparable functionality). Young people are particularly fit for word processing programs such as Word, where one in five is rating grade 1, and every second is rating grade 2. The rating for PowerPoint is similarly positive: In dealing with presentation programs, almost two-thirds of the youngsters score 1 or 2. Youth rate their skills significantly less well in calculation programs such as Excel, with only seven percent rating grade 1 and one fifth rating grade 2.


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Source: Medienpädagogischer Forschungsverbund Südwest (mpfs)


Logo: mpfs - Medienpädagogischer Forschungsverbund Südwest