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FOCUS


Right to Education and Digital Literacy

Every child has a right to education, access to which has to be provided without discrimination and on the basis of equal opportunity. (UN-CRC Art. 28)

The educational system shall enable children to benefit from the the opportunities and cope with the risks in the digital environment. Children should learn how to make competent use of content appropriate for their objectives and needs, and they should gain the skills to live safely and freely in the digital world. Here, parents and educators should provide competent, responsible and trustful support.


Focus

  • 18.12.17

    Child Safety and Internet Governance - a brief look back and forward

    Jutta Croll, Stiftung Digitale Chancen

    Even in 2006, when the IGF itself was in its infancy, the topic of child safety and protection was on the agenda of the forum. Not necessarily as a top priority and not free of conflicts. Strategies targeted at the prevention of access to potentially harmful content for children were contentious and had its detractors from the Freedom of Speech Community. Through the years empowerment of children and youths for a safe and responsible usage of the Internet gained in importance.

  • 20.11.17

    November 20th 2017: Today is International Day of Children´s Rights

    November 20th 2017: Today is International Day of Children´s Rights, the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child is celebrating it´s 28th birthday. Since the adoption of this convention the world has been changing, today internet, apps and online games are a matter of fact for children. They bring new opportunities for playing and learning and they can strengthen the rights of children, but they also carry endangerment.

  • 22.05.17

    The World is Changing - About Growing-up in a Digital Environment

    Jutta Croll

    In 1989, the die Convention on the Rights of the Child (UN-CRC) was passed by the United Nations. To this day 195 states have ratified the Convention, making it the United Nations’ most widely recognized human rights document. The Convention is meant to grant special protection to young people under the age of eighteen. The ratifying states commit themselves to implement and guarantee the rights to freedom and protection as laid down in the 41 articles of the treaty.

Studies and publications

  • FIM-Study 2016 - Family, Interaction, Media

    Study on communication and media use in families
    Sabine Feierabend (SWR Medienforschung), Theresa Plankenhorn (LFK), Thomas Rathgeb (LFK)

    The FIM study provides insights into communication and media use in families in Germany. Contents and forms of intra-family communication, communicative patterns of behaviour within the family and media use in the family context are the main focus of this study. Five years after the first FIM study, the FIM study 2016 provides insights into the everyday media life of families with smartphones and mobile Internet. For the FIM Study 2016, all members of around 300 families with children between the age of 3 and 19 were interviewed personally.

  • JIM-Study 2017 - Youth, Information, (Multi-) Media

    Baseline Study on media-behaviour of twelve to 19 year olds in Germany
    Sabine Feierabend (SWR Medienforschung), Theresa Plankenhorn (LFK), Thomas Rathgeb (LFK), Medienpädagogischer Forschungsverbund Südwest (mpfs)

    As part of the JIM study 2017, twelve to 19-year-olds in Germany were interviewed in addition to the general use of media and their media dealings with regard to homework, learning and school. Altogether, pupils between the ages of 12 and 19 years estimate that they spend an average of 97 minutes on a weekday with their homework (with and without computer / internet), while girls invest much more time with 115 minutes than boys (80 minutes). Almost half of their learning and homework time (45% and 44 minutes, respectively), the 12 to 19-year-old students work every day at home on the computer or on the internet for school. The digital homework time increases with the age of the young people from a good half hour for the twelve to 13-year-olds to a good hour for the full age students.

    Additional content for: Digital Literacy | Media Usage


  • The State of the World’s Children 2017: Children in a Digital World

    UNICEF, UNICEF

    As the debate about whether the internet is safe for children rages, The State of the World’s Children 2017: Children in a Digital World discusses how digital access can be a game changer for children or yet another dividing line. The report represents the first comprehensive look from UNICEF at the different ways digital technology is affecting children, identifying dangers as well as opportunities. It makes a clear call to governments, the digital technology sector and telecom industries to level the digital playing field for children by creating policies, practices and products that can help children harness digital opportunities and protect them from harm.

  • Annual Report 2015 of the Centre for Child Protection on the Internet (I-KiZ)

    Contemporary Youth Media Protection
    Centre for Child Protection on the Internet, I-KiZ - Zentrum für Kinderschutz im Internet

    The task of the I-KiZ, the Centre for Child Protection on the Internet, together with youth media protection stakeholders from politics, business, science and practitioners, was to provide a forum for the development of strategies for contemporary youth media protection and the promotion of better protection of children and adolescents.

  • The Intelligent Risk Management Model

    Centre for Child Protection on the Internet, I-KiZ - Zentrum für Kinderschutz im Internet

    Based on the findings of the HBI, the I-KiZ works with an Intelligent Risk Management model for youth media protection. The model consists of an age-related concept designed both to avoid confronting children with harmful content and contacts, and to promote strategies to counter and deal with the same.

  • May 2017

    Children´s and young people´s rights in the digital age

    a series of articles in the SAGE journal; Vol 19, Issue 5, 2017
    SAGE Journal, SAGE Journal

    In Vol 19, Issue 5, 2017 of the SAGE Journal in the New Media & Society category, there are a number of contributions to children's rights in the digital age.

  • February 2017

    KIM-Study 2016 - Childhood, Internet, Media

    Baseline Study on the media usage of six to 13 year olds in Germany
    Sabine Feierabend (SWR Medienforschung), Theresa Plankenhorn (LFK), Thomas Rathgeb (LFK), Medienpädagogischer Forschungsverbund Südwest (mpfs)

    According to their own statements (assessments), 77 percent of all six to 13 year olds rarely use a desktop PC or laptop. The PC is used by all kids at home, and half sits in front of a PC when they are at a friend’s place. Yet, only two fifths use a PC in school. The probability of PC usage in school is significantly higher for older kids going to secondary school (Haupt-/Realschule: 53 %, Gymnasium: 56 %), than for kids going to primary school (27%).

  • November 2016

    JIM-Study 2016 - Youth, Information, (Multi-) Media

    Baseline Study on media-behaviour of twelve to 19 year olds in Germany
    Sabine Feierabend (SWR Medienforschung), Theresa Plankenhorn (LFK), Thomas Rathgeb (LFK), Medienpädagogischer Forschungsverbund Südwest (mpfs)

    Within the JIM-Study in 2016, twelve to 19 year olds in Germany were interviewed about their media-behaviour, with regards to homework, learning and school. It also dealt with regulations regarding mobile phones and WLAN at school.

  • Media Policy Project Blog

    Blog: Media and Communications Policy by London School of Economics (LSE)
    London School of Economics (LSE)

    The Media Policy Project’s goal is to start conversations between policy makers, civil society actors, and media professionals about the latest media research. It wants policy makers to have timely, easy access to relevant research and to the range of views held by civil society. It also works to engage the policy community with research on the policy making process itself. Additionally, it provides tools for anyone looking to stay up-to-date on media policy issues, through the briefings, event calendars, dossiers, and lists of on-going consultations.

  • Parenting for a Digital Future Blog

    London School of Economics (LSE)

    How do parents seek to bring up their children in the digital age? What is parents’ vision of their children’s future and that of the wider society? What risks and opportunities will characterise the digital future?

  • October 2014

    Children’s Rights in the Digital Age

    A download from children around the world
    Amanda Third, Delphine Bellerose, Urszula Dawkins, Emma Keltie, Kari Pihl Young and Well Cooperative Research Centre, Young and Well Cooperative Research Centre

    In July and August 2014, 148 children from 16 countries, speaking eight different languages, participated in workshops to share their views on their rights in the digital age.

    Additional content for: Digital Literacy | Media Usage


  • Global Kids Online

    Researching on children's rights in the digital age
    UNICEF Office of Research-Innocenti, London School of Economics and Political Science

    Global Kids Online is an international research project that aims to generate and sustain a rigorous cross-national evidence base around children’s use of the internet by creating a global network of researchers and experts.

    Additional content for: Media Usage


  • EU Kids Online Network

    Hans-Bredow-Institut

    How do children and young people in Europe use the internet, what risks do they face, what opportunities does the internet offer, and how are they dealing with the varying possibilities? What are the similarities and differences here between the different European countries?

  • Child Rights International Network - CRIN

    Child Rights International Network - CRIN is a global research, policy and advocacy organisation. Our work is grounded in the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. A world where children's rights are recognised, respected and enforced, and where every rights violation has a remedy.

Documents